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Division of Professional Education CAEP Accreditation

Academic Program
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Impact of P-12 Learning and Development (CAEP 4.1)

Narrative

Teacher candidates begin to work with P-12 students in the field as early as their first introductory course to education. This early hands-on experience offers candidates an opportunity to find out what school is like from the teachers’ perspectives as they tutor children, observe assessment and instruction in whole or small groups, and provide support (often in online settings) for teachers and students. Because of this early experience, candidates are able to see first-hand how their interactions with children affect the children’s academic learning as well as their social-emotional needs so that when they finally get to do their clinical internship, or student teaching, they are well aware of high-impact strategies that will lead to student success. Student success is measured through pre-and post-testing with students, formative assessments, and other formal and informal measures that are reported to the division through course assignments as well edTPA and CPAST (Candidate Preservice Assessment of Student Teaching) scores that are collected during the clinical internship. In addition, field experience and student teaching courses may use video technology that allows candidates to videotape their lessons with students for time-stamped, meaningful feedback from the instructor and their peers in the class.

Case Studies

Teacher candidates begin to work with P-12 students in the field as early as their first introductory course to education. This early hands-on experience offers candidates an opportunity to find out what school is like from the teachers’ perspectives as they tutor children, observe assessment and instruction in whole or small groups, and provide support (often in online settings) for teachers and students. Because of this early experience, candidates are able to see first-hand how their interactions with children affect the children’s academic learning as well as their social-emotional needs so that when they finally get to do their clinical internship, or student teaching, they are well aware of high-impact strategies that will lead to student success. Student success is measured through pre-and post-testing with students, formative assessments, and other formal and informal measures that are reported to the division through course assignments as well edTPA and CPAST (Candidate Preservice Assessment of Student Teaching) scores that are collected during the clinical internship. In addition, field experience and student teaching courses may use video technology that allows candidates to videotape their lessons with students for time-stamped, meaningful feedback from the instructor and their peers in the class.
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edTPA Scores by Program 2019-2020

Unavailable this year.

CPAST Scores by Program 2019-2020

Click to read case study.

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State Surveys of Pre-Service Teachers 2019-2020

*No survey data available.

*The surveys of pre-service teachers are administered during candidates’ clinical internship. Each candidate rates the effectiveness of the Division of Professional Education in satisfactorily meeting their needs so that they can be effective teachers. There was incomplete data for the 2019-2020 school year due to the disruption of the pandemic; therefore, it is impossible to report on the results of this survey this year.

Indicators of Teacher Effectiveness (CAEP 4.2)

Evidence of teacher effectiveness of Notre Dame College completers comes from several sources. State data includes Value-Added Measurements, Ohio Teacher Evaluation System scores, and state report cards for the schools in which completers work; however, due to state mandate during the pandemic, this information is not available for this year.

We do know that 100% of our first year Resident Educators persisted to the next level between 2016 and 2019. Evidence also shows that 100% persisted from the second to third year in 2016 and 2017 and that 97.1% persisted in 2018. Data is not available for 2019. One hundred percent of Resident Educators in their third year persisted in 2016-2017 with no data available for 2018 or 2019; and finally, 100% completed in 2016 with no data available for the years between 2017 and 2019. This, we believe, is solid evidence of the effectiveness of our teacher candidates once they enter the workforce.

Satisfaction of Employers (CAEP 4.3)

Due to the restrictions caused by the pandemic, there is no data to report for the 2019-2020 academic year concerning satisfaction of employers based on surveys that are usually administered by the state. A group of educator preparation programs in Ohio created a Qualtrics Survey for employers that Notre Dame College will be disseminating in spring 2021 that should provide some helpful information. Further, the Division of Professional Education is served by an Advisory Board of teachers, principals, and former candidates that meets once each semester to discuss the effectiveness of our programs and our completers. While the discussions in these meetings are anecdotal and are not backed by quantitative data, it is clear that partners and completers have a high degree of confidence in the division to prepare candidates. It is also useful here to point to the Resident Educator data reported in the previous section. Persistence through the 4-year program indicates employer satisfaction with completers with 97% to 100% persistence rates.

Satisfaction of Completers (CAEP 4.4)

While the state surveys of completers did not yield enough data for each licensure area, there was sufficient evidence overall to report completers’ satisfaction with the Division of Professional Education.

The division scored above average in the following areas to prepare completers to

  • Differentiate instruction
  • Work with families and caregivers
  • Understand students’ diverse cultures, language skills, and experiences
  • Understand Ohio Licensure Program requirements
  • Understand Ohio Operating Standards
  • Understand requirements for the Resident Educator program
  • Understand Value-Added measurements

Areas that completers noted that need improvement include the preparation of completers to

  • Use technology to enhance teaching and student learning
  • Collaborate with community leaders
  • Work with diverse peers, teachers, and faculty

In response to the areas of need, the division has created a Maker Space and teacher demonstration classroom that provide candidates with access to a Smartboard, document viewer, video camera with green screen, computers, a 3-D printer and 3-D printer pens, two laminators, a die cutter, and manipulatives for math and reading instruction that should give candidates a beginning foundation for using technology in their classrooms.

The division has a Facebook page and a Twitter account that provide updates on candidates and completers, promote teachers’ fairs and job openings, broadcast news concerning education on all levels, and share instructional strategies.

There are plans to provide more community resources so that candidates can learn how to work collaboratively with local businesses and politicians to affect change in schools.

Diversity in the teacher workforce can be challenging given the propensity of White females in the schools. Notre Dame College works with Educators Rising groups from local high schools to recruit a more diverse candidate pool and seeks to find placements with diverse educators when placing candidates in the field. The division has just begun an initiative this year to create a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive environment for our candidates, on campus and off.

A recent Survey Monkey of a random sample of completers indicated that they felt that the Division of Professional Education gave them a sound foundation for being effective teachers in their classrooms. There are plans to conduct more of these surveys to gather important data that may not be provided by state surveys.

Graduation Rates and Title II Reports

Ability of Completers to Meet Licensing Requirements and Additional State Requirements

The state of Ohio was not able to conduct the traditional assessments for Resident Educators in 2020; however, available data for RESA educators will be available in 2021.

Table I shows the 2019-2020 pass rate data for the Ohio Assessments for Educators tests in early childhood, special education, elementary education, educational leadership, and reading. There were not enough tests taken in middle childhood or adolescent/young adult education tests to provide a statistical analysis.

Results from the assessments are analyzed by the full-time faculty members of the division in terms of a content domain analysis so that adjustments in the curriculum can be made to better prepare candidates for the tests. We realize that the past year’s assessments reflect the disruptions of the COVID-19 pandemic, but the division will nevertheless make revisions according to candidates’ needs.

Licensure reports provide information concerning the number of licenses that were granted in the 2019-2020 academic year. Beginning in March of 2020, the state of Ohio allowed candidates to earn temporary licenses because of the number of licensure test sites that were closed. Candidates who received a temporary license will be allowed to re-apply for their Resident Educator license as soon as they are able to take and pass the requisite Ohio Assessments for Educators.

Pass Rate Data
TestNDCState
Early Childhood Professional Knowledge100%93%
Early Childhood Content73%91%
Multi-Age K-12 Professional Knowledge (MMIS)76%91%
Special Education Content79%87%
Foundations of Reading82%82%
Elementary Education (4/5 Endorsement), Subtest I92%86%
Elementary Education (4/5 Endorsement), Subtest II69%76%
Reading Subtest I (Reading Endorsement)88%87%
Reading Subtest II (Reading Endorsement)100%97%
Educational Leadership82%86%

Ability of Completers to be Hired in Education Positions for Which They Have Prepared

Data from 2019-2020 are not available for this portion of the report. Incomplete data from previous years indicates that a majority of completers were able to find positions in public schools. Many of Notre Dame’s teacher candidates go to work in charter schools and parochial schools where data is incomplete. Candidates did struggle to find jobs for fall 2020, and we are following up on as many of those completers as possible for the 2020-2021 year.

Student Loan Default Rates and Other Consumer Information

Additional Information

National Center for Education Statistics College Navigator Default Rates
Professional Education Graduation Comparisons
Licensure Reports
Letter of accreditation from CAEP (2018)
CAEP Annual Report 2020
CAEP Annual Report 2019
CAEP Annual Report 2018
CAEP Annual Report 2017
CAEP Website for Further Information Concerning Accreditation
CAEP Website for Further Information Concerning Accreditation
Ohio Department of Higher Education Website for Further Information Concerning Metrics Reports

Our Faculty

Faculty and staff at Notre Dame College are central to the personal attention and caring heart of our student learning environment; the esteem and accomplishment of our higher education model; and the warmth, collaboration and economic impact of our workplace.

Pam Cook

Assistant Professor
Professional Education

M.S. University of Dayton
M.S. Cleveland State University
B.A. University of Michigan

Regina Hall Room 332
pcook@ndc.edu
216.373.5373  

Sue Corbin

Division Chair & Associate Professor
Professional Education

Ph.D. Kent State University
M.A. Kent State University
B.A. Kent State University

Regina Hall Room 328
scorbin@ndc.edu
216.373.5429  

Sandra Golden

Assoiciate Professor
Professional Education

Ph.D. Kent State University
M.Ed. M.A. Cleveland State University
B.S. Dyke College
A.A.B. Cuyahoga Community College

Administration Building Room 408
sgolden@ndc.edu
216.373.6471  

Crystal Johnson

Director of Community Relations and Recruiting
Professional Education

Administration Building
cjohnson@ndc.edu
216.373.6386  

Elizabeth Ritz

Assistant Professor
Professional Education

Ph.D. Kent State University
M.A. Baldwin Wallace University
B.S. Kent State University

Regina Hall Room 320
eritz@ndc.edu
216.373.5328  

Members of Pi Lambda Theta,

Notre Dame College

Alexas Barone Dustin Clark Kirsten Duggan Kelly Fisher Mary Fuerst Angela Gale Lisa Hammond Morgan Hansen Camryn Kidd Beca Kimmet Megan Knott Steven Koblin Jennifer Kraft Sandra Lombardi Michelle Lozoya Tiffany Macioce
Nadia Miller Kelsi Miske Jill Rafferty Rebecca Regnier Nyesha Salters Jessica Shufelt Molly Seifert Jaime Stockert Taylor Sturm Isabelle Thompson Sarah Tolson Bryce Traylor Megan Valenti Kaylee Via Samantha Winkler Andrew Wolens

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