An essential part of every culture, the adventure prize to date and "unAmerican" apple pie


Alumna Linda Warner and faculty member John Patton, sporting Notre Dame swag, decide not to try the special. While Haggis is the national dish of Scotland, the traditional version of the cultural cuisine has been banned in the United States since 1971, though some (Scottish) reports indicate the USDA soon may lift the restriction.

by Sr. Eileen Quinlan, SND, Ph.D., ’74, professor of English/communication

Cullen skink

Food is an essential part of every culture, and an essential element of the adventure of traveling. Ireland and the U.K. have provided some exciting culinary explorations.

Corbin Lisser, the older brother of Carrington Lisser, a junior at Notre Dame, gets the adventure prize to date for savoring a plate of haggis, neeps and tatties: a tower of traditional Scottish mashed turnips ("neeps") and potatoes ("tatties") with a layer of haggis, a sausage-like mixture of lamb pieces, oatmeal and spices.

Candy Fischer, a former staff member, and I enjoyed hot bowls of cullen skink (haddock and potato chowder). 


Beef Bourguignon, an example of "mains"

Ordering something that sounds familiar sometimes brings a surprise: fish and chips comes with a side of peas, whole or mashed. Apple pie might have a crust not flaky but more like shortbread, without cinnamon but served in a warm vanilla custard sauce. 

A favorite meal for several travelers has been the full Irish (and English and Scottish) breakfast, especially the bacon, which is not the dry, crisp style Americans prefer, but thicker, softer and meatier. 

Lamb stew got raves in Dublin, and the salmon is always succulent.

Prize desserts have included the sticky toffee pudding (a warm bread-like cake with raisins in toffee sauce), a chocolate creme brûlée and the "un-American" apple pie.

Smithwick's beer, a Guinness product, got raves in Dublin.


Beef Bourguignon, an example of "mains"

A full Irish (and English and Scottish) breakfast

The presentation of the "mains"—the main course platters—is always elegant, and the platters are huge!

Most of all, travelers appreciate the gracious kindness of the servers. The wait staff in all the hotels and restaurants reflect the face of the European Union: Polish, Spanish, Romanian as well as Irish, New Zealander and Scottish. 

 

Events

Sep
21
September 21
8:30 AM
Friday September 21, 8:30am
Campus Ministry Office - Regina Hall, Room 308
E.g., 09/21/18
E.g., 09/21/18