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A City of Many Faiths and Cultures

I arrived in Israel on Thursday, and on Friday a British woman in our program took me to Christ Church, the first Protestant church in Jerusalem, consecrated in 1849.

The Angelical missionary society wanted to invite Jews to discover Jesus. The sanctuary holds a huge wooden plaque with the Ten Commandments and, on each side, the Lord's Prayer and the Apostles' Creed in Hebrew. The whole thing looks like the Ark of the Covenant that holds the Torah scrolls in a synagogue. It's an active community today celebrating a sabbath service in Hebrew that honors Jesus.

On Saturday evening, after the sabbath ended, I walked around the pedestrian street lined with shops. Then I heard singing. It was a group of about 25 youth from South Korea singing what I found out were hymns to Christ as well as lively Korean folk songs. Some Canadian teens began dancing and little Jewish kids were clapping and spinning around too. It was a moment of joy and cultural mingling that wouldn't happen in too many other places in the world.

A group from South Korea sings folk songs in Jerusalem.
A group from South Korea sings folk songs in Jerusalem.