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Notre Dame Science Students Network With Area Employers

Seven Cleveland-area employers─including three Notre Dame College alumni─gave biology majors the scoop about science careers in a campus networking event.

The career panel, coordinated and facilitated by the College Career Services Center and funded by a grant received from the Cleveland Foundation’s Fenn Educational Fund, was designed to connect current students in the sciences with professionals in a myriad of fields.

Seventeen students, all biology majors, took advantage of the opportunity to ask questions and network with panelists representing business, industry, government and healthcare.

Participating panelists included:

  • Roy Anderson, director of Allied Health at Cleveland Clinic
  • Mark Citriglia, manager of analytical services at Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District
  • Annie Dunham, personnel manager at Cuyahoga County Board of Health
  • Clive Hamlin, director of the Laboratory Department, University Suburban Health Center
  • Katherine Kline Myers, chief resident at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital
  • Gretchen LaRusch, research assistant at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
  • Laura Prince, director of human resources at Cleveland HeartLab
  • Ken Wade, human resources lead at AMRESCO Biochemicals and Life Science Research Products

Dunham, Myers and LaRusch are all alumni of Notre Dame. While imparting advice to students, Dunham, in particular, attributed much of her initial job search success to the College Career Services Center.

The employers shared with students their individual career paths. Most panelists’ journeys demonstrated to the biology majors that career paths in general, and especially in the sciences, are usually far from certain or linear.

In addition, the employers urged students to be inquisitive and ask questions when new to a job. Strong writing and communication skills were identified as essential─along with knowledge of basic statistics─for success in science careers. The panelists also encouraged students to perform every task, even basic lab skills, with enthusiasm.